9

Unfortunately, some martial arts as practiced in the training hall are unsuitable for general use in street fights. The danger with high kicks is not just the surface as mentioned by cs1971, there are other factors too: high kicks are slower (they have further to travel) you are more vulnerable during the delivery and retraction stages of the kick ...


9

It's certainly possible to hit someone while they work on a takedown. It sounds like you're asking specifically about countering wrestling shots, where the grappler attacks the hips and legs, rather than clinch takedowns generally, so I'll focus on that. (Nevertheless, remember that upper-body clinch takedowns are common and effective as well.) Punishing ...


8

I trained in Bujinkan for less than a year, but it was a very rewarding experience which informs my martial arts to this very day. It is a library of classical jujitsu technique. Virtually anything you can think of is in there. Whenever I analyze karate and kung-fu forms ("kata bunkai" to Okinawan karate), I often use my understanding of classical jujitsu to ...


8

I'm generally opposed to anime questions, but there are a significant handful of MMA fights where one fighter is known to be semi-conscious yet still fighting. Edgar/Maynard 2 is my go-to example: Edgar is clearly concussed early, and has said on the record that he has no memory of multiple rounds, but he fought to a split draw nevertheless. He picked ...


7

Learn to walk away… Your problem is that you get angry: stop doing that. Anger management classes and/or techniques should be your first step. Your second step should be to learn about de-escalation techniques. Finally, a trip to no nonsense self defence is needed -- especially the notes on "street fighters". All these will help you not get into those ...


7

My background is penjak silat, which uses a lot of kerambit. Yes, they're good combat knives...however, the way you're framing this makes them sound like magic super knives, which they are not. Right now they're trendy with the macho tactical crowd, which means they get painted as The Most Dangerous Weapon (TM) just like every other fad does eventually. ...


7

There are a number of problems with demonstration videos like this. First of all, the attacker is essentially frozen in place while the defender is able to move and do stuff. It's not realistic at all. In general, when you watch "demonstration" videos, make a note whenever the student seems to freeze while the instructor goes right along through a series of ...


7

I have an answer that I wrote which goes over the pressure point "knock out" phenomenon: How do you knock someone out using pressure points? In summary, the pressure point knock-out stuff is either over-hyped or outright nonsense. There are only a few areas on the body which when hit will produce a knock-out. But all of the complicated TCM (traditional ...


7

Allowing slams (and hence teaching DEFENSE against slams) seems to be a crucial part of BJJ. But [they] don't they train that. Every BJJ gym I've trained at for more than a couple months has taught me how to prevent and defend against slams. Techniques to prevent being slammed were in three of the first BJJ instructional videos I watched. Most BJJ purple ...


6

Ranging in self defense is actually very different than sparring or competition fighting. Start with this: what range are you at when you realize you're being attacked? (and don't have an option to get away?) Are you 20 feet away, with them running and yelling at you? Did someone tackle you from behind and you're on the ground? See, the first problem is ...


6

Basic headlock release: 1) twist your body to get the front of your neck at the gap (if your throat is being closed by the arm this is top priority). 2) With the arm that is closest to the attacker - do a front crawl motion (bring the arm between you and the attacker low to get the arm behind you both). 3) Bring the arm up and between yours and the ...


6

MMA Go to your local MMA gym's sparring sessions. We have beginners come in all the time that just want to fight and not learn technique. They get absolutely destroyed and never come back, but whatever, if that's what they want. Remember to tap early, even to strikes. You're going to get hurt. Answering your question aside, you should instead sign up for ...


6

There are essentially two types of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu schools today: 1) Self-defense first, sport later. 2) Sport first, self-defense is an afterthought. Knowing which type of BJJ school you attend will help you answer this question. All of the Gracie schools of BJJ generally teach with the same principle: Everything in the white belt phase is for self-...


6

First, the science: https://rollingaroundbjj.com/fights-end-up-on-ground/ That article looked at 383 street fights which were available on Youtube. Never mind the fact that in order to make it onto Youtube in the first place, maybe something spectacular had to happen, or maybe it was just a stupid looking fight. Who knows. So the data set might be a tad ...


5

One possible use for a high kick is intimidation. A high kick delivered cleanly is impressive-looking, and may convince other attackers to back off. That said, I'd only recommend it if you're really certain of your ability to pull it off, and to recover if it doesn't come off cleanly. Of course, there is another purpose to training high kicks, namely ...


5

A lot depends on the exact circumstances of the situation. How unevenly matched are the combatants in size and strength? What are the stakes (pain, humiliation, injury, death)? What are you prepared to do to remedy the situation? Some things are pretty straight forward. Make certain your airway and blood-flow is clear. If they aren't, you can thrash and ...


5

This is going to vary from individual to individual. What is going to matter most is one's training and comfort level. I don't advocate throwing a spinning jump kick when your life is on the line, but if you are a taekwondoin and you are really comfortable with busting out a roundhouse kick to your assailant's brainpan, then by all means do so. I have ...


4

Outside the training hall the ground surface is unpredictable. Inside it's completely predictable, you can kick all day and on every step it'll behave the same. You can throw any kick you like and your supporting foot will remain planted. Exactly the same kick outside, on damp or dusty, or gritty, or whatever ground wearing whatever footwear, will put you on ...


4

Is there a situation in a street fight where high kicks would be the best choice? Lots of them. I once had an opponent charge at me from about 10 metres away, right hand raised obviously intending a big hook: I delivered a gliding side kick to his chest - laying him flat. If I'd wanted to hurt him seriously, I'd have gone higher. It had the advantage of ...


4

In a street assault, the normal action is that an opponent will be attacking you by surprise, possibly from behind, or where you are unable to fully maneuver. However, the situation you describe the attacker is constantly preferring to take distance and do probing attacks rather than focus on getting you on the ground/against a wall. The reason you don't ...


4

Generally speaking, human nails aren't much of a threat. There is more of a chance the individual with long nails will injure themselves trying to use them as weapons (e.g. painful tears and nail-bed trauma) than there is to an intended target. You have already identified the eyes as particularly vulnerable (and honestly they are just as ready a target to ...


4

My dojo teaches a few techniques against hair grabs. First if your hair is being pulled put your hand over theirs and clamp it down. Then, twist your body stepping away from the thumb. This should turn the hand over. Finally push the arm away keeping the twist. If we are talking about shoulder or longer length hair and it is being grabbed far from the scalp ...


4

I have seen it braided and then folded up on the head or wrapped around the head and pinned down. This keeps the flopping and easy grabbing out of the way. If someone fingers the head to grab, it's going to happen anyway regardless. I have seen the above and a fitting hat, but I'm not sure the hat did anything more than strapping it down. Ultimately I ...


4

Whilst there might be some art out there that is a "walk in and fight" scenario It is a sure fire way to get badly hurt or killed! An actual martial art will get you moving and improve your fitness, but more importantly will teach you to release your anger and frustration in a controlled and civilised way. In my own classes I let angry/frustrated students ...


4

This is a debatable subject. Some discount it, some swear by it. In the long run, it is important to know. If you want to knock someone out, you're supposed to know to hit them in the head. And there are specific places and angles which will optimally land the KO. Without such knowledge, your chances of achieving a KO are fairly slim. Having said that, ...


4

Ninjutsu is nearly never something with a heritage from the former ninja / shinobi. This would be rather infiltration / survival training, or special ops training. Bujinkan Ninjutsu has a rather good mixture, mostly coming from the classic Japanese Jujutsu. It has a higher focus on live sparring and applying techniques to an 'unwilling' partner. The sports ...


4

First, in a street fight you want to hit your opponent as fast as possible and then be on your way You have decided to get in a boxing match. As in many boxing matches, it's difficult to land a knockout blow, and someone closes to clinch to avoid getting punched. Now you have entered a grappling position, and there is no referee to separate you. you ...


3

Nails aren't really all that dangerous, but they can be painful, especially when practicing things like grabs and releases. Personally, I've had my share of scratches from long nails in practice. If anything his nails are more of a threat to himself, they're probably fragile enough that they could break.


3

A karambit isn't inherently any more dangerous than any other knife of a similar size. The biggest practical deference when defending against someone wielding a karambit (versus more traditionally hilted knives) is the ring. The ring will make the karambit somewhat more difficult to disarm than a knife without such a retention device. Generally speaking, ...


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