20

This is a common reason people get into martial arts. You're probably going to hear a lot of people tell you that's not a good use of martial arts, out of some general sense of "violence is wrong" paternalism. What I will say, instead, is that not everyone's bullying situation is the same. One person might punch a bully in the nose and be left alone from ...


8

Getting through the defenses of an opponent is one of the fundamental concepts of every combat strategy devised by man. There are at least as many ways to circumvent an opponent's defenses as there ways to defend oneself. I will attempt to break things down to a basic level. Here are some of the most common means of defense utilized in unarmed combat: ...


7

Which martial arts is the best to learn to intimidate the school bullies? None of them. You might get a better return on your time if you take some acting classes instead. Intimidation has nothing to do with the martial arts in general, martial arts simply gives you the skills to be able to deliver on your intimidating behavior. But therein lies the ...


6

Some martial arts are good at helping you survive an actual physical confrontation. (Though their efficacy varies wildly by the particular style, school, and instructor, as well as the time and effort the student puts in.) Many martial arts can also be good at simply improving your confidence and physical presence in such a way that you won't have the ...


6

My advice whenever you're facing either someone who's more advanced or bigger is to concentrate on your basic, "high percentage" techniques and be as precise and as quick as you can. Stick to things you know well, and avoid any temptation to do something "cool" or something you've just recently learned. In another answer, I discussed what "high percentage" ...


5

Asking for a strategy upfront is not going to be beneficial, especially on the internet - we have never met this opponent so all we know is he's bigger and stronger than you (and we have no idea how big you are). Train hard. Be confident in your knowledge and capabilities. You should start learning to read your opponents - it's an important skill to have, ...


4

I think that reversing the order of your question makes the answer you seek easier to find. We both practice Bujinkan and our instructor thinks that sparring is not how you should be practicing, so we can´t turn to him for help. This indicates that you should practice another art, because what this one is teaching you does not seem to be what you want. ...


4

Before going too far be aware that strategy should also be about dealing with uncertainty. Nothing ever goes perfectly to plan. Every good wrestler who is not being flippant about the opponent will think & plan about the match. This can be as simple as sizing up the opponent, watching them in other matches or many other ways to assess and then plan. For ...


3

Zen_Hydra explained specific techniques for hitting through a guard and is realy thorough. I agree that going into any more technical depth would be wrong and might be overwhelming. Nevertheless I have to give some advice additionally as I could not comment on the original question. The sad truth is that there is no real strategie on how to punch someone. ...


2

I'm similar. What I do is try to break down their posture as quick as possible, this means holding with your feet is less of a problem. Once broken down I try working off to a side with a arm, and am playing with a Sean Williams guard. If they posture up while I'm trying to break them down. I get aggressive about hunting for a hip bump, if they defend, ...


2

It's not really about reading up on strategies but developing your own strategy for what works for you. When you're starting off in grappling/wrestling, you're going to primarily defending when going against higher levels. As your skill increases, you will be more on the offense. I'm a BJJ practictioner, I've seen even with my teachers, the strategies are ...


2

Yes and No. If I am close enough to you I can move my shoulder and punch you long before you can dodge or block. If I am far enough away I couldn't possibly hit you without your reactions giving you a good chance to evade my strike. In addition many styles, boxing included, will teach ways to hide shoulder movement with foot movements and clever steps. That ...


2

A great question. One of the most effective ways to control a fight is by maintaining the element of surprise; by confusing, frustrating and by doing so, greatly incapacitating your opponent. By being unpredictable, you take the initiative, and a fighter who is constantly being forced to respond to his or her opponent will always find it a lot more difficult ...


2

There's an important discussion to be had here on Strategy vs. Tactics. Strategy is going to be very dependant on the situation you are training for/find yourself in, and tactics will be dictated by the larger strategy. To provide examples, if training for self defence the strategy is to avoid putting yourself in dangerous situations, deescalate where ...


1

That's a good approach. But things move fast in there when you're sparring with professionals. They may throw combinations in bunches, and you won't get a chance to see the shoulders. Personally, I just go by feeling now in days. If their right hand lands on my gloves—I figure the left is coming, so I prepare to either move, block or counter. Landing ...


1

The shoulders are about half a meter away from each other, so if you're focused on one the other could be comin' for ya. And I agree with @dawgdeelux, especially with the jab. I was originally taught to look at the center of the chest, where your peripheral vision can see all 4 limbs to some extent and where you're not going to be eye-faked or intimidated by ...


1

Can't say I've ever heard that one "Watch the shoulders". The guys we train with are typically fast enough that once you realize the shoulder is moving they have already made contact, not to mention, once they figure out your watching their shoulders they'll use shoulder motion against you. We look towards the chest, that way we can see both hands ...


1

The stance isn't a real predictor of attack. Street fights are more about psychological advantage than skill. Showmanship can also work in some cases. I have stopped attackers quickly because one, they did not expect me to fight, and second, because I stood in a particular karate stance. My experience also shows hitting first gives you a psychological ...


1

Upright sideways stance outside of punching range, they might be going to attempt some kicks they learned in Taekwondo class. In a "front stance" or "walking stance", hands in front of them, they're more likely to punch. In your face, chest-to-chest, then they look around a bit, they might be preparing to come back around with a surprise ...


1

Know your enemy and know yourself Understanding how an opponent thinks and their available weapons can determine the best strategy to engage them using your own strengths. For example, fighting a boxer at close range where you can grapple but they cannot punch you effectively may be a better alternative than engaging at punching distance. Psychology Modern ...


1

Can't add comments yet, but just wanted to say that Steve Weigand has the best answer here. just wanted to add that with time you should incorporate some "dirty boxing" into your arsenal when fighting bigger opponents (5ft5 person here). There's no other way of beating somebody who has been training as long and as good as you, and weighs 10kg+ more. Block ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible